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About This Club

Read/listened to an interesting Sports book lately? Post it in the club and discuss it with the TBP community. Sports related books only please. All sports acceptable.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. The 64 Best Sports Books of All Time Anybody read a good amount of these?
  3. BrassBulls12

    The Performance Cortex

    The Performance Cortex: How Neuroscience Is Redefining Athletic Genius Why couldn't Michael Jordan, master athlete that he was, crush a baseball? Why can't modern robotics come close to replicating the dexterity of a five-year-old? Why do good quarterbacks always seem to know where their receivers are?On a quest to discover what actually drives human movement and its spectacular potential, journalist, sports writer, and fan Zach Schonbrun interviewed experts on motor control around the world. The trail begins with the groundbreaking work of two neuroscientists in Major League Baseball who are upending the traditional ways scouts evaluate the speed with which great players read a pitch. Across all sports, new theories and revolutionary technology are revealing how the brain's motor control system works in extraordinary talented athletes like Stephen Curry, Tom Brady, Serena Williams, and Lionel Messi; as well as musical virtuosos, dancers, rock climbers, race-car drivers, and more.Whether it is timing a 95 mph fastball or reaching for a coffee mug, movement requires a complex suite of computations that many take for granted--until they read The Performance Cortex. Zach Schonbrun ushers in a new way of thinking about the athletic gifts we marvel over and seek to develop in our own lives. It's not about the million-dollar arm anymore. It's about the million-dollar brain. I am currently working my way through this one, saw it on an episode of MLB Now. It is incredibly interesting. It's basically trying to explain the "natural athlete"
  4. BrassBulls12

    Best seller: Tiger Woods

    In 2009, Tiger Woods was the most famous athlete on the planet, a transcendent star of almost unfathomable fame and fortune living what appeared to be the perfect life. Married to a Swedish beauty and the father of two young children, he was the winner of fourteen major golf championships and earning more than $100 million annually. But it was all a carefully crafted illusion. As it turned out, Woods had been living a double life for years—one that unraveled in the aftermath of a Thanksgiving-night car crash that exposed his serial infidelity and sent his personal and professional lives over a cliff. Still, the world has always wondered: Who is Tiger Woods, really?In Tiger Woods, Jeff Benedict and Armen Keteyian, the team behind the New York Times bestseller The System, look deep behind the headlines to produce a richly reported answer to that question. To find out, they conducted hundreds of interviews with people from every facet of Woods’s life—friends, family members, teachers, romantic partners, coaches, business associates, physicians, Tour pros, and members of Woods’s inner circle.From those interviews, and extensive, carefully sourced research, they have uncovered new, intimate, and surprising details about the man behind the myth. We read an inside account of Tiger’s relationship with his first love, Dina Gravell, and their excruciating breakup at the hands of his parents. We learn that Tiger’s longtime sports agency, International Management Group (IMG), made $50,000 annual payments to Tiger’s father, Earl Woods, as a “talent scout”—years before Tiger was their client. We discover startling new details about Earl, who died in 2006 and to this day lies in an unmarked grave. We come along as Tiger plunges into the Las Vegas and New York nightclub worlds alongside fellow superstars Michael Jordan and Charles Barkley. We are whisked behind the scenes during the National Enquirer’s globetrotting hunt to expose Tiger’s infidelity, and we get a rare look inside his subsequent sex-addiction treatment at the Pine Grove facility in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.But the portrait of Woods that emerges in Tiger Woods is far more rewarding than revelations alone. By tracing his life from its origins as the mixed-race son of an attention-seeking father and the original Tiger Mom—who programmed him to be “the chosen one,” tasked with changing not just the game of golf but the world as well—the authors provide a wealth of new insight into the human being trapped inside his parents’ creation. We meet the lonely, introverted child prodigy who has trouble connecting with other kids because of his stutter and unusual lifestyle. We experience the thrill and confusion of his meteoric rise to stardom. And we come to understand the grown man’s obsession with extreme training and deep sea diving—despite their potential for injury—as a rare source of the solitude he craves. Most of all, we are reminded, time and time again, of Woods’s singular greatness and the exhilaration we felt watching an athletic genius dominate his sport for nearly twenty years.But at what cost? Benedict and Keteyian provide the answers in an extraordinary biography that is destined to become the defining book about an authentic American legend—and to linger in the minds of readers for years to come. https://www.amazon.com/Tiger-Woods-Jeff-Benedict/dp/1501126423/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1530889389&sr=8-6&keywords=sports+books
  5. Set to release on Oct. 9th 2018, now available for pre- order. This was the sponsored book on amazon, I thought it looked interesting. https://www.amazon.com/League-Rivals-Created-Launched-Sports/dp/0465048706/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1530889389&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=sports+books&psc=1 The National Football League is a towering, distinctly American colossus spewing out $13 billion in annual revenue. Yet its current dominance has obscured how professional football got its start. In The League, John Eisenberg reveals that Art Rooney, George Halas, Tim Mara, George Preston Marshall, and Bert Bell took an immense risk by investing in the professional game. At that time the sport barely registered on the national scene, where college football, baseball, boxing, and horseracing dominated. The five owners succeeded only because at critical junctures in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s each sacrificed the short-term success of his team for the longer-term good of the League. At once a history of a sport and a remarkable story of business ingenuity, The Leagueis an essential read for any fan of our true national pastime.
  6. BrassBulls12

    AWOL

    I saw this one, and thought it looked interesting. I am also reading a non sports book a the moment. After Lincoln: How the North Won the Civil War and Lost the Peace. i have also started working on a sports book called The Performance Cortex: How Neuroscience Is Redefining Athletic Genius. Its pretty good so far looking at tracking the exact moment a hitter decides to swing ect.
  7. Brad

    AWOL

    Sorry that I have had no contributions here for a while, been on a run of non-sports books The last four were: Understanding Trump - I may have mentioned that. By Newt Gingrich - it was a good read. Set aside your pre-programmed disgust. Just telling you like it is. Then, even more deplorable, I read Ben Shapiro's book, Bullies. Again, a vivid description of what we see today in the acerbic political ideologue environment. Shifted gears and listened to a book that was $.99, thought it might make sense, it was called How to Lead When You're Not in Charge. Some common sense stuff there, but pretty good for a leadership/self help kind of thing. Honestly, I was thankful when it was over, even though the last chapter was one of the best. The reason for the post, is the book I just finished. I actually got the Kindle book and Audible audiobook on Amazon through their kindle unlimited trial membership for a grand total of two or three bucks, but it was well worth it. While it got into a lot of detail, I loved the book. Parts history, leadership and American life, the book was about Circuit City, appropriately titled Good to Great to Gone: The 60-Year Rise and Fall of Circuit City. A very good read/listen. Hopefully as I peer into my available selections I pick up a sports book. I did just buy Ahead of the Curve: Inside the Baseball Revolution. So maybe I'll get to that, depends on what I'm feeling. Read on TBP!
  8. Brad

    Moneyball

    I listed this one further down...I completed it within the last half year...audiobook as well. I would recommend, I really enjoyed listening. I never saw the movie. I remember Bill James from when I was a young lad. It was interesting to hear about his contributions in the early days.
  9. swamprat

    The Duke of Flatbush

    Duke Snyder's autobiography. A paperback given to me by a friend of my father, Korean War vet, and USF football season ticket holder from day one until he died a few years ago. The book is a very good read about the times in which Snyder played, including the introduction of Jackie Robinson into white baseball.
  10. swamprat

    Moneyball

    Audio book. As usual. the book is much better than the movie. Much more detail, though that may bore some. I'm all about the details.
  11. By John Feinstein I picked this up on Audible a few years ago. It's a very interesting perspective of the lives of players, coaches, and umps in, primarily, the AAA level of the minor leagues. Players on the way up to the majors. Players on the out of the majors. Players who play their entire career in the minors. I did not know umpires have to qualify to stay keep their jobs. If they don't move up after so many years, they get moved out. Coaches who manage in the minors, just waiting for that chance to be the third base coach on their major league club.
  12. swamprat

    A Raging Bull: Chasing the Big Time

    I've read it twice. A lot of USF history and I enjoy his hoops perspective.
  13. I thought it was a little repetitive at times, but overall a good read. I love anything about Epstein. such a baseball genius. On October 12, 2011, Theo Epstein became the new Chicago Cubs president of baseball operations, flipping a switch on the lovable-loser franchise and initiating a plan to accomplish in Chicago what he'd succeeded in as general manager of the Boston Red Sox: ending a World Series drought. It would require a complete team tear-down and turnover, a new farm system foundation of young talent which Epstein and Cubs GM Jed Hoyer gradually added to with gutsy trades and timely signings. After years of rebuilding, Epstein's crystalline vision has been unquestionably realized in the form of one of the most exciting and talented teams in baseball, led by heavyweights like Anthony Rizzo and Kris Bryant as well as visionaries like manager Joe Maddon. In The Plan, David Kaplan of CSN Chicago and ESPN Radio goes behind the scenes with the Cubs and their front office, walking the steps of their captivating rise to becoming 2016 World Series champions. Featuring exclusive interviews with Epstein, owner Tom Ricketts, and other team insiders, this is the definitive account of a new era on the North Side.
  14. Finished both of these audiobooks. I highly recommend the Bird/Magic book. Of course, I was a Showtime fan back in the 80s and a Magic Johnson fan. The book covered some things I knew about Magic, but a lot that I did not. I was so anti-Bird back in that era, I knew little about him. Much as the book describes, if you were pro-Magic, you "hated" Bird. I wouldn't describe it as hating Bird but really disliking the Celtics. The book takes you from their meeting the the World Invitational Tournament (I had not known about this) and of course the NCAA Champ and all the NBA games and playoffs, wrapping up around the end of their careers on the Dream Team. You learn more about the HIV announcement and how teammates and others reacted. Learned a lot about what a tough guy Bird was in the face of physically painful injuries and wear and tear. It was a pleasure to listen to, will likely repeat at some time in the future. I give it 5 horns.
  15. In honor of the club I grabbed a couple on sale at Audible.com Being a one-time Magic Johnson fan, I bought this on sale: I also sprung a few bucks for Charles Barkley's audio version of his book: I started, first, with Sir Charles' book (originally published in 2002). As he says, it's not really about Sports, but it is in a way. I have listened to the first 4 chapters or so. It is read by the author, so if you can follow Charles you'll know when he is making a point important to him...and other times, he just makes you laugh. I am continuing it today and will likely wrap it up. This is such an old book, you may have already heard about it. He speaks a lot to "controversial topics" and certainly discusses social issues he experienced and what his thoughts are. As you can see, both those audiobook are very inexpensive. So, it's hard to have a bad read listen. I'll add more as I come across it. I look forward to the Magic/Bird book. Loved that Nat champ game, and the Showtime era afterwards.
  16. John Smoltz was one of the greatest Major League pitchers of the late twentieth / early twenty-first century—one of only two in baseball history ever to achieve twenty wins and fifty saves in single seasons—and now he shares the candid, no-holds-barred story of his life, his career, and the game he loves in Starting and Closing.- Amazon Its really more inspirational than analytical. He talks about his faith a lot and uses the book to give his side of stories about his career. Some I knew before, some I did not. I thought it was pretty good overall though. Really looked at his personal life but you can tell he guarded a few things. https://www.amazon.com/Starting-Closing-Perseverance-Faith-More/dp/0062120565
  17. BrassBulls12

    On the watch list

    I just put the Clemente book on my amazon list. Might buy it tonight.
  18. I thought I'd put this out there because it is on my watch list more out of reverence than a desire to read right now....I don't read fiction, but when I do, I'll read this. Chris Gallen was an original Bull. He, along with board member @Dave_Glaser were the very early internet Bulls back in the 90s and co-hosted the original USFBulls.com site long before TBP got started. He was affectionately known as @USFreak and posted here and there on TBP a decade or so ago. I think it's cool he was a crazy Bulls fan and a novelist.
  19. Forgot to ask about these....my kindle list was comprised of those titles I already bought. These are the titles I have on a watch list, noting that usually I can catch a deal at a great price by listing it if I am not in a have to read now mode. :cheap,yes Watch List: https://amzn.to/2IWX0A8 https://amzn.to/2I5u3kj https://amzn.to/2DXaWXf I'm a big Clemente guy, and a Pirate fan, hence the book on the kindle list I read about the 70s Pirates. I think the G.S. Warrior book is the basketball version of Moneyball, but since I coach it, I should learn it. And of course the Coach K book, heard it reference a number of times, seems like a winner, no pun intended.
  20. Brad

    The kindle/audible collection

    Of the four I have here, this is the first I read. I found it entertaining, and when you think about it, these guys on the bubble in pro sports have it rough. Here is the Amazon description: Amazon has a great deal right now on the audiobook version (I had the ebook) for just $2.99. His writing was entertaining and insightful, I imagine his narration would be hard to turnoff/put down as well. I recommend.
  21. BrassBulls12

    The kindle/audible collection

    Awesome. I recommend the rest of the series, I'm going to buy Killing England next. I'm working on John Smoltz's Starting and Closing right now. I keep it in the locker to use on bus rides but I really want to get to The Plan, which about the building of the Cubs Franchise soon though so I might bring that one home.
  22. Brad

    The kindle/audible collection

    I just finished listening to Killing the Rising Sun Saturday! I haven’t read or listened to the Rick Ankiel book yet. Been teeing it up since it came out, but always selected something different to start. I am not one of those guys that can read more than one at a time.
  23. BrassBulls12

    The kindle/audible collection

    I also do a lot of history reading. Recently I finished most of Bill O’Reiley and Martin Duggard’s “killing” series. I read killing Lincoln and killing Kennedy last year and knocked out killing Patton and killing the rising sun last week. They can be a little presumptuous with their details but the story like delivery of the books keep me interested.
  24. BrassBulls12

    The kindle/audible collection

    How was the Phenomenon? I’ve almost bought that one a few times?
  25. There is a ton of data in the book on the issue. The author really looks at the different approaches from top high school prospects, to aging veterans. He even takes a look at the Japanese and how their culture plays into training and treatment. I don’t believe there any difference I where the tendon comes from. It mostly depends on what the patient has. It does discuss a newer technicique that has been developed in that is thought to reduce the risk of nerve damage and the risk of detachment. It’s a figure 8 type of thing if you want to look into that. That procedure is an interesting topic of its own. It’s really a book that explores the complexity of the issue.
  26. Read the WaPo link. That's intriguing. Especially when you consider the number of USF pitchers coming off of TJ surgery last couple seasons. It always seemed that some came back better and stronger. Sounds like some data in the book to support. Do tendons from some parts of the body fare better than others when connecting the arm bones?
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